Travelrific® Travel Journal

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Archive for April, 2020

The Bayeux Tapestry

By Linda Tancs

France is no stranger to grand tapestries, like that found in Angers memorializing a book in the Bible. Head three hours north and you’ll find another treasure in tapestry in Bayeux. The Bayeux Tapestry (well, actually, an embroidery—but let’s not get too technical) measures a staggering 230 feet in length and depicts the Norman conquest of England. The UNESCO-listed artifact is on display in an 18th-century seminary.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The Town of Cycling

By Linda Tancs

In the center of Sweden lies Örebro, one of the largest municipalities in the country. It boasts the moniker “the town of cycling.” And why not? With numerous parks, countryside and nature reserves, it presents the perfect opportunity for biking, which is why the town has plenty of cycle lanes and bikes for rent. Wherever you bike, it’s hard to miss the castle. The medieval fortress stands on an islet in the river Svartån in the city center. Start your visit at the castle’s visitor center, which offers great views of the river and the Storbron bridge. The city is well connected by train from Stockholm or Gothenburg.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Place of Mythic Proportions

By Linda Tancs

According to Greek mythology, Thessaly is the birthplace of Achilles, the handsome hero of the Trojan War. In ancient times it was known as Aeolia and appears as such in Homer’s Odyssey. It’s likewise known as the region boasting the almost mythical Meteora, a complex of monasteries perched above towering sandstone peaks. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it’s the biggest and most important group of monasteries in Greece after those in Mount Athos. Originally comprising 24 structures, six monasteries remain today, “suspended in air” as their name, Meteora, attests. The sites are variably accessible by paths, bridges and steps. Check opening times as they all have different visiting days and hours. Go now when the crowds are thinner.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Port and More in Algeciras

By Linda Tancs

Algeciras is a port city in the south of Spain, the largest city on the Bay of Gibraltar and one of the largest ports in Europe. It’s easy to write it off as just a transit point to Morocco, but a wander around the city will prove its worth as a matter of historical interest. Take the Reina Cristina, for instance, a historic hotel opened in 1901 and evocative of British colonial architecture seen in nearby Gibraltar. Visited by royalty, statesmen and film stars, the hotel was originally built to meet the housing needs arising from the opening of the Algeciras-Bobadilla railway in the late 1800s. The city is also the birth and burial place of one of its most famous sons, Paco de Lucia, a famous flamenco guitarist and composer. The Paco de Lucia Route will take you to 10 sites in and around the city that were either a part of his life or referred to in his songs.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Cusco’s Sun Temple

By Linda Tancs

Koricancha was the main Inca temple in Cusco (Cuzco), Peru. Its interior was ablaze in gold leaf, befitting its status as the temple of the Sun god. The church and convent of Santo Domingo was built on its Inca foundations by the Spanish in the 1500s. You’ll find the ruins of the ancient temple around the patio of the convent, which also contains a gallery of paintings that includes 17th and 18th century canvases. A guided tour of the site lasts about one hour.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Cave Life in Turkey

By Linda Tancs

Ürgüp is a Turkish town located in the historical region of Cappadocia, land of the fairy chimneys. It’s particularly known for its caves, both homes and hotels, cut into the soft volcanic rock. The Esbelli district boasts a number of boutique cave hotels. Renowned for its beautifully colored stone, its prime location also sports great views of the town and surrounding mountains. The locale is reachable by bus, car or plane.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

What Lies Beneath in Suffolk

By Linda Tancs

Few areas expose the tribal origins of England better than Sutton Hoo in Suffolk. That’s where you’ll find an awe-inspiring Anglo-Saxon royal burial site from the seventh century unearthed in 1939, where a ship thought to be the final resting place of an Anglo-Saxon king was discovered. Akin to the discovery of a pharaoh’s tomb, the ship’s burial chamber revealed artifacts of a powerful leader, featuring a sword, shield, helmut and exquisite items crafted in gold and garnet. The ship is represented today by a full size, steel reproduction measuring around 88 feet long. Visit the High Hall for information on the lives of the Anglo-Saxons and just how Sutton Hoo came to be such a significant place in English history. Guided tours are also available.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

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