Travelrific® Travel Journal

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Archive for australia

Old and New in Tasmania

By Linda Tancs

The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) in Tasmania is the largest privately funded museum in the Southern Hemisphere. Its charm lies in the fact that you can view antiquities and modern art side by side in a mostly-underground facility located on a winery estate in Berriedale. Just a stone’s throw from Hobart by ferry or road, the MONA Roma Express bus operates between Hobart and MONA often and takes around 30 minutes one way.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Bondi to Bronte

By Linda Tancs

Sydney’s best known coastal trek is the Bondi to Bronte Walk. A favorite with locals and tourists alike, the two-mile stroll follows the coastline from Bondi Beach to Bronte Beach. It may be one of the most photographed walks in Australia with its sandstone cliffs and stunning panoramic views. You might even spot a humpback whale or two. Start your walk around sunset for some particularly magical vistas. The best way to get to Bondi’s starting point is via public transport, with trains traveling between the city and Bondi Junction, and plenty of buses departing from Bondi Junction to Bondi Beach.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Sleeping With the Fishes in Australia

By Linda Tancs

Reefsuites, Australia’s first underwater hotel, gives new meaning to the phrase “sleeping with the fishes.” Moored offshore at Hardy Reef, each room features floor-to-ceiling views of the spectacular underwater world of the Great Barrier Reef, including 1,500 species of fish along with turtles and rays. What better way to be surrounded by marine life without a wetsuit? There’s also access to the underwater observatory and optional activities like helicopter touring and scuba diving. Located 40 nautical miles from Airlie Beach, the journey begins with a cruise through the Whitsunday Islands to Hardy Reef.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The Beehives in Purnululu

By Linda Tancs

One of the best-loved attractions in Western Australia’s Kimberley region is the Bungle Bungle Range (also known as the Bungle Bungles). Often likened to giant beehives, the range comprises a landscape of orange and black striped karst sandstone domes rising 820 feet above the surrounding semi-arid savanna grasslands. Amazingly, these prehistoric formations were known only to local Aboriginals until a documentary film crew discovered the site in 1983. Touted the most outstanding example of cone karst in sandstone anywhere in the world, it’s an iconic feature of Purnululu National Park.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Captain Cook’s Landing

By Linda Tancs

In 1770, Captain Cook’s first landing in Australia took place near Silver Beach on the Kurnell Peninsula headland. He named the site Stingray Harbour but later changed it to Botany Bay because of the variety of plants found there. An important heritage-listed site, you can discover the area for yourself at the Kurnell area of Kamay Botany Bay National Park. Take the Burrawang walk from the Kurnell Visitor Centre. As you pass over the dune you’ll see views of the bay where Cook’s expedition ship Endeavour was first sighted as well as a plaque marking the location where he landed.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Geological Monument in Australia

By Linda Tancs

At Hallett Cove Conservation Park in South Australia you’ll find evidence of the nation’s ice age over 200 million years ago. One of the country’s most outstanding geological sites, its rugged outcrops show sediments that were deposited in a glacial lake around 270 million years ago. You’ll see it on a glacial hike less than two miles long, which also presents The Sugarloaf (a local landmark named for its resemblance to a mass of hard refined sugar), the result of sediments deposited into the lake formed from melting ice.

The Underground Down Under

By Linda Tancs

About 500 miles north of Adelaide in the Australian Outback is the subterranean town of Coober Pedy, where most of the town’s 1,800 or so residents live in underground shelters carved from the sandstone walls, giving new meaning to the phrase “a hole in the wall.” The place is worth a visit to explore the unique lifestyle enjoyed there, which also happens to be the opal capital of the world. Together with the surrounding region, it supplies around 85% of the world’s opal supply.

Australia’s Jumbo Shrimp

By Linda Tancs

Jumbo shrimp takes on a whole new meaning in West Ballina, Australia, where you’ll find The Big Prawn, billed as “the world’s largest artificial prawn.” Nearly 30 feet high and weighing around 40 tons, the beloved crustacean survived demolition years ago and was relocated to its current site beside Bunnings, a hardware store. As you might imagine, the prawn was built to celebrate the local fishing industry.

Between Two Capes

By Linda Tancs

Extending from Cape Naturaliste in the north to Cape Leeuwin in the south, Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park in Western Australia offers more than 300 limestone caves, significant stands of karri and jarrah forest and impressive views from limestone sea cliffs. The park can be entered at many points along the coast. You can also walk the 86-mile territory (over several days, of course) via the Cape to Cape Walking Track between the park’s namesake lighthouses. Whatever you do, don’t miss Sugarloaf Rock, a popular observation area for seabirds and thought to be the only place in the South West region where the red-tailed tropicbird nests.

Australia’s Favorite Steam Train

By Linda Tancs

Easily accessible by fast electric train from Melbourne, Puffing Billy is arguably Australia’s favorite steam train. Over a century old, the train still runs on its original 15-mile track between Belgrave and Gembrook. That route takes you through the Dandenong Ranges, a set of low mountain ranges east of Melbourne, featuring Emerald Lake Park and cool climate gardens. You can book a tour through any of the major day tour operators.

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