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Archive for canada

Golden Rules in Canada

By Linda Tancs

There’s good reason why the town of Golden, British Columbia, rules in western Canada. Sitting squarely in the Canadian Rockies, it’s surrounded by six of Canada’s most stunning national parks: Yoho, Glacier, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay and Mount Revelstoke. It’s also a pioneering town, once home to surveyors and explorers seeking lucrative trading routes in the Pacific Northwest. Those adventures led to the creation of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), using Golden as a base camp as the CPR created a cross-country network of rails. Later, the establishment of the Trans-Canada Highway transformed the area from a forest outpost to a vibrant community that now boasts one of the best backcountry skiing regions in Canada. Regardless when you visit, you’ll be wooed by the spectacular scenery, hiking trails, waterfalls, lakes and heritage sites of the national parks in your midst.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Mosaic of Habitats

By Linda Tancs

Biodiversity is the hallmark of Bruce Peninsula National Park in Ontario, Canada. A protected area of the UNESCO Niagara Escarpment World Biosphere Reserve (an ancient tree-lined ridge of limestone that stretches from Niagara Falls across Southern Ontario to the Bruce Peninsula), it marks the last unbroken stand of forest in the densely-populated Southern Ontario region. Draped with a rugged shoreline and clear, blue water, its diverse array of ecosystems like mixed forests, wetlands and lakes host an abundance of species. You’ll find black bears, red-shouldered hawks, owls and flying squirrels in the forests. In the park’s wetlands and lakes, the at-risk common snapping turtle shares turf with fish such as yellow perch and amphibians like salamanders and reptiles. Camping in the park is popular now, as is relaxing in the warm waters of Singing Sands Beach. The visitor center is located in the town of Tobermory.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Trail for the Sweet Tooth

By Linda Tancs

The Nanaimo bar is a popular Canadian dessert, named after its place of origin on Vancouver Island. The tasty, multilayered treat requires no baking and generally comprises a crumb base, custard and ganache. Its variations, though, are so numerous among purveyors that a trail has developed around it. The Nanaimo Bar Trail is a self-guided tour of over 30 scrumptious stops from Lantzville in the north to Cedar in the south and including a stop on Gabriola Island. Pick up your map at the Nanaimo Visitor Centre on Northfield Road.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Québec’s Grand Canyon

By Linda Tancs

Just 30 minutes from Québec City and its many tourist attractions, Canyon Sainte-Anne is Québec’s “grand canyon.” Its waterfall, 243 feet high, is one third higher than Niagara Falls. The steep-sided gorge boasts three suspension bridges, but if that’s not adventurous enough for you, then consider Air Canyon, a chair ride soaring 296 feet over the gorge at speeds up to 31 miles per hour.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Murals Galore in Moose Jaw

By Linda Tancs

Moose Jaw is a city in southern Saskatchewan, Canada. Situated on the Trans-Canada Highway, it was chosen as a division point for the Canadian Pacific Railway in the 1800s and became a boom town in the 1920s after those railway connections drew numerous manufacturing industries. Today it boasts of itself as the mural capital of North America, sporting some 46 outdoor murals on building exteriors downtown. That’s sure to please lovers of street art. While you’re there, don’t miss Mac the Moose, a giant moose sculpture on the grounds of the town’s visitor’s center on the corner of East Thatcher Drive and the Trans-Canada Highway.

Playground of the Gods

By Linda Tancs

You might think that an attraction known as Playground of the Gods hails from some exotic island. In this case, the locale is actually in Burnaby, the third largest city in British Columbia. Also known as Kamui Mintara, it comprises more than a dozen wooden totems perched atop Burnaby Mountain, created by Japanese sculptors Nuburi Toko and his son Shusei in the Ainu indigenous tradition of northern Japan. These works commemorate the goodwill between Burnaby and its sister city, Kushiro, Japan.

A Howling Good Time in Ontario

By Linda Tancs

Located in southeastern Ontario, Canada, Algonquin Provincial Park is noted for its maple hills, rocky ridges and thousands of lakes. It’s a great place for biking, birding, camping, canoeing, fishing and howling. Yes, you read that right. On each Thursday in August, the park offers a public wolf howling event (depending on the weather and the availability of wolves), an engaging program on wolf ecology followed by demonstrations of wolf howls by a staff of naturalists. Be sure to check the event board on Thursdays for any cancellations. Visitors meet at the Outdoor Theatre on Highway 60 and then proceed to a location where real wolves may answer the call.

The Latest Dirt on Alberta

By Linda Tancs

If you’re ready to get down and dirty, then Alberta, Canada, is the place for you. On August 11 and 12 Mud Hero makes its return to Canyon Ski Resort in Red Deer. Canada’s largest obstacle event, it features 18 obstacles over hills, mud, water and plenty of challenging terrain. Obstacles are meant to be a mix of fun and challenge, and some also offer difficulty levels so that all participants can have a great run within their ability level. Spectators are welcome at no charge.

Suspense in Vancouver

By Linda Tancs

Located just minutes from downtown Vancouver on the North Shore, Canada’s Capilano Suspension Bridge stretches 450 feet across and 230 feet above Capilano River. Originally made of hemp rope and cedar planks in 1889 by Scottish engineer George Grant Mackay, it was later replaced by a wire cable bridge. Since Mackay’s day, millions of visitors have enjoyed the stunning views across the deep gorge. Adding to the excitement is the newest attraction, a cantilevered walkway clinging to the granite cliff high above Capilano Canyon called Cliffwalk. A free shuttle service to the park operates year round from various points in the city.

From Quarry to Garden

By Linda Tancs

Over a century ago, Jennie Butchart decided to transform an abandoned quarry into a garden. The result is The Butchart Gardens, one of the world’s premier floral show gardens. Located on Vancouver Island, Canada, this National Historic Site is resplendent year round. You’ll find remnants of the old quarry at the Sunken Garden’s expansive walls. From there you’ll encounter one of the finest dahlia gardens in the region (particularly this time of year) along the Concert Lawn Walk. Another favorite this season is the Rose Garden, with its extensive collection of floribundas, ramblers, climbers and hybrid tea roses. Summer is also a great time to take a boat tour of Tod Inlet from the wharf near the bottom of the Japanese Garden. And don’t miss the lush color in the Italian and Mediterranean gardens. A fireworks show every Saturday night in summer will round out your colorful experience.

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