Travelrific® Travel Journal

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Archive for travel writing

Québec’s Grand Canyon

By Linda Tancs

Just 30 minutes from Québec City and its many tourist attractions, Canyon Sainte-Anne is Québec’s “grand canyon.” Its waterfall, 243 feet high, is one third higher than Niagara Falls. The steep-sided gorge boasts three suspension bridges, but if that’s not adventurous enough for you, then consider Air Canyon, a chair ride soaring 296 feet over the gorge at speeds up to 31 miles per hour.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The Knick in New York

By Linda Tancs

When it comes to the Knickerbocker Hotel in New York City, you get the pleasure of staying not only at a luxury hotel but also of enjoying a storied building. Affectionately known as The Knick, the glamorous, Beaux-Arts style dwelling was built in 1906 by John Jacob Astor IV, scion of one of America’s most influential families. Of course, that means that it was “the” place to be for the cognoscenti and glitterati of the day. Indeed, it was home to world-famous tenor Enrico Caruso and his family and a popular meeting place for bigwigs like John D. Rockefeller and other financiers and industrialists. After Astor’s death on the Titanic, the hotel subsequently closed until its rebirth in 2015. Designated a New York City Landmark in 1988, it remains one of Manhattan’s premier luxury hotels in Times Square.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Protected in Sumatra

By Linda Tancs

Located on the tip of the southwest region of Sumatra, Indonesia, Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park is like a fortress for the area’s endangered flora and fauna. For instance, one of the park’s objectives is to protect its lowland rainforests, one of Earth’s most diverse and most threatened. The park is also home to three of the world’s most endangered species: the Sumatran elephant, the Sumatran rhino and the Sumatran tiger. The park’s conservation efforts aim to decrease poaching and deforestation. The main point of entry to the park is from the town of Bandar Lampung.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Coronavirus and Travel

By Linda Tancs

As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Maiden’s Tower

By Linda Tancs

Located in Istanbul, Turkey, on an islet at the southern entrance to the Bosphorus, Maiden’s Tower is iconic for its scenic views of the strait and the skyline. It was originally built in 1110 as a defense tower by the Byzantine Emperor Alexius Comnenus although legend has it that an ancient emperor built the tower to hide his beloved daughter whom a fortune teller prophesied would die from a snake bite. Since its inception it has been rebuilt and repurposed many times and now serves as a restaurant. Shuttle boats go there several times a day from both the European and Asian side of Istanbul.

Hitting the Wall in Malta

By Linda Tancs

It might be hard to imagine, but there’s a counterpart to China’s Great Wall sitting unobtrusively on an island archipelago in the Mediterranean. The wall in question is across the northern portion of Malta, a defensive line built by the British army in the 19th century to patrol its interests in the region. Known as the Victoria Lines (commemorating Queen Victoria), it runs the width of the country (at seven and one-half miles) and offers breathtaking panoramic views from its bastions. Go now for pleasant temperatures and a chance to enjoy Malta’s brief blooming season.

New Zealand’s Treasured Possession

By Linda Tancs

New Zealand’s second-largest national park, Kahurangi takes its name from a Maori word meaning “treasured possession.” It’s easy to understand why. For one thing, the park served as a filming site for the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. Another one of its assets is the network of walking trails. The Heaphy Track, in particular, covers 48 miles of subtropical rainforest, high country, river valley and coast. It’s the same route used for hundreds of years by Maori tribes en route to the treasures of greenstone, a durable stone that plays an important role in Maori culture. And its ancient geology gives rise to even more treasures, like the discovery of New Zealand’s oldest fossil (540 million years old) and an extensive network of caves. Motueka, Takaka, Karamea and Murchison are the park’s gateway towns. Check with the Department of Conservation for the latest weather and track conditions before you set out.

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