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Archive for greenland

Best Ice in Greenland

By Linda Tancs

Greenland’s Ilulissat Icefjord is filled with icebergs that calve from Sermeq Kujalleq, the fastest moving glacier in the world at 131 feet daily. The massive ice field occupies the same area as 66,000 football fields. The best way to take it all in is a flightseeing tour by helicopter or small plane. At ground level, you can walk along the raised pathway to Sermermiut or hike along the marked Blue Route trail. Whichever route you choose, be sure to take a midnight cruise in the icefjord, when the icebergs change from white and blue to shades of orange and red when struck by the midnight sun.

 

Moving at a Glacial Pace

By Linda Tancs

A glacial pace is taken to mean a slow, lumbering movement.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that– unless we’re talking glaciers.  Ice movements in New Zealand and Greenland are causing some consternation among naturalists and scientists alike, not to mention the uncertain effect on tourism.  Consider this:  New Zealand’s 2 million-year-old Tasman Glacier in Mount Cook National Park is losing 500 meters each year, an uncomfortable progression for a skiing destination touted as the ultimate New Zealand alpine adventure.  On the other side of the world, Greenland’s glaciers have been shrinking for 100 years, losing some 150,000 tons of ice each year.  That’s bad news for Disko Bay, where adventurists travel to marvel at a colossal collection of floe.  Better get there before the glaciers leave town.

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Icecapade

By Linda Tancs

Most elementary school students probably learn that Greenland isn’t really green. In fact, the Greenland ice sheet covers nearly 82% of it. So except for seeing icebergs (or not seeing them, as the case may be), is there any reason to go there? Air Greenland would have you answer that question in the affirmative, and they’ve put together a site to make their case.  You’ll find out the best time for dog sledding and what to do during the spring, summer and winter tourist seasons.  Yes, there really are three seasons in this Arctic island, the world’s largest island by area.  And don’t forget about the northern lights (aurora borealis), a popular tourist attraction from November to February.

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