Travelrific® Travel Journal

Picture postcards in prose.™ Check out the blogroll on the front page for official merchandise and other resources!

Let Freedom Ring

By Linda Tancs

Located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence and freedom. Once housed in the steeple of the State House, it’s now ensconced in a glass chamber at Liberty Bell Center with a view of Independence Hall in the background. The bell rang out from the tower of Independence Hall in 1776, summoning the citizens of Philadelphia to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence by Colonel John Nixon. The center is located at 6th and Market streets in Independence National Historical Park.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Slice of America in Denmark

By Linda Tancs

You might not expect America’s upcoming Independence Day to be especially celebrated vigorously anywhere else in the world unless, of course, you’re up-to-date on your Danish history. Arguably the largest July 4 festivity outside the U.S., the Rebild Celebration takes place in a national park (Rebild Bakker) in the hills of northern Denmark. The reason for this unusual event relates to a mass exodus of Danes to the U.S. driven by economic opportunity that reached an apex in the early 20th century. In gratitude for the good fortune that ensued and seeking a place in the homeland for reunions, a group of Danes purchased a parcel of land in northern Denmark that was ultimately granted to the king, who established the area as a national park. As a symbol of friendship between the nations, the park was used not only as a gathering place for homesick Danes but also as a place of celebration of their adoptive country’s independence. Taking place virtually every year since 1912, the July 4 festival draws thousands of expats and locals as well as dignitaries and celebrities.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Pure Bliss in the Alps

By Linda Tancs

Some say that Eibsee is the most beautiful lake in Germany. It’s easy to understand why, with its crystal-clear, turquoise waters framed by the Zugspitze, Germany’s highest mountain. Over 3,000 feet above sea level, the lake (named for the yews that used to grow around it) is dotted with islets around its northern side, creating many a photo stop for walkers or hikers. The cool mountain water is great for swimming in summer, too. The A95 motorway from Munich will get you there in about an hour.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The Aristocracy in Argentina

By Linda Tancs

In the shadow of the bustle of Buenos Aires is the well-to-do suburb of San Isidro. It’s regarded as the capital of rugby because it houses two of the historical clubs of the sport in Argentina: Club Athletic San Isidro and San Isidro Club. You’ll also find the Hipódromo there, one of the largest horse racing tracks in the Americas, flanked by busy restaurants. Art, class and culture merge at Villa Ocampo, the riverside mansion of the late Victoria Ocampo, a prominent Argentinian writer and intellectual. Her estate is one of many in this wealthy enclave, one of the most aristocratic in the country.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Resurrected Ox in Brazil

By Linda Tancs

You might be surprised to learn that one of Brazil’s biggest festivals centers around the story of a resurrected ox. Popularly known as Boi Bumbá, it’s second only to Carnival in Rio in terms of popularity, no small feat considering its locale in the middle of the Amazon. The legend goes that a farmer killed a wealthy landowner’s favorite ox (boi) to satisfy his wife’s craving, creating a feud that resolved only when the local medicine doctor succeeded in bringing the prized animal back to life. The story is told over the last weekend in June by a maze of dancers in a presentation that’s partly theatrical, musical, puppet show, religious procession and tribal ritual. Held in Parintins, it’s an easy flight away from Manaus.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Balcony of the Mediterranean

By Linda Tancs

Tarragona is a Spanish port city south of Barcelona. Once the Roman colony of Tarraco, it’s brimming with Roman ruins like ancient tombs and remnants of an amphitheater along with a miniature reconstruction of the ancient city. One of its most charming features is Balcó del Mediterrani (Balcony of the Mediterranean), an observation area offering views of the sea, the port, the beach and the Roman amphitheater. Rising over 130 feet above the sea, it’s located at the top of the city’s main street (Rambla Nova). Touching the ornate railing is said to bring good luck.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The History of Florida Citrus

By Linda Tancs

Citrus is an integral part of Florida’s identity, and the industry was especially prominent in the 1800s in Eustis—so much so, in fact, that the town was once known worldwide as the “Orange Capital of the World.” It’s fitting, then, that the town hosts the only independently housed citrus museum in the state. Among its collection, the Citrus Museum features devices used to measure the quality of the fruit, packers’ seals, a device to convert ripe, green-skinned oranges to an orange color and memorabilia like labels and posters.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Little Girl and Her Geese

By Linda Tancs

Scholarly pursuits may prevail in the university town of Göttingen, Germany, but its most iconic feature is Gänseliesel (Little Goose Girl), a statue erected in 1901 atop a fountain in front of the medieval town hall. The sculpture depicts a young girl and her geese. So beloved is this local landmark that a tradition arose among the newly-minted Ph.D. graduates to plant a kiss on her bronze cheek. In their view, that makes her the most-kissed girl in the world.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Trail for the Sweet Tooth

By Linda Tancs

The Nanaimo bar is a popular Canadian dessert, named after its place of origin on Vancouver Island. The tasty, multilayered treat requires no baking and generally comprises a crumb base, custard and ganache. Its variations, though, are so numerous among purveyors that a trail has developed around it. The Nanaimo Bar Trail is a self-guided tour of over 30 scrumptious stops from Lantzville in the north to Cedar in the south and including a stop on Gabriola Island. Pick up your map at the Nanaimo Visitor Centre on Northfield Road.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The Cosmo Side of Mauritius

By Linda Tancs

Port Louis is the cosmopolitan capital of the island of Mauritius. Founded in 1735 by the French governor and pioneer Bertrand-François Mahé de La Bourdonnais, it offers a plethora of cultural and historical treasures. For one thing, it boasts the oldest racecourse in the Southern Hemisphere, Champ de Mars, where lively horse racing ensues on weekends from March to December. The theater is another pearl, one of the oldest in the region, fashioned after a typical London theater. Did you know that the extinct dodo was endemic to the island? Just as priceless is the Twopenny Blue stamp; an original issue is at the Blue Penny Museum. Originally printed in 1847, the stamps were issued by the then-British colony of Mauritius, the first empire stamps produced outside Britain. The remaining specimens belong to the Crown, some postal museums and some very lucky collectors.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

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