Travelrific® Travel Journal

A blog for travel enthusiasts. Listen to our podcasts on the blogroll at Travelrific® Radio. Visit our Wanderful Places® Travel Shop for travel-inspired merchandise!

Oxford of the East

By Linda Tancs

Voted India’s most livable city in 2018, Pune mixes contemporary metropolitan flair with striking, historical landmarks. Known as the cultural capital of Maharashtra, it’s also been dubbed “Oxford of the East” owing to the renowned educational institutions there. An iconic attraction is Aga Khan Palace, built by Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan in 1892 to house famine-ravaged people in the area. Later it would serve as the centerpiece of the Indian freedom movement when Mahatma Gandhi, his wife, secretary and others were incarcerated there.

Advertisements

Wonderful Wetlands in Wales

By Linda Tancs

Wetlands are the primary source of drinking water for people and wildlife. Boasting amazing biodiversity, more than 100,000 species of animal rely on freshwater ecosystems alone. Although the world has lost more than half its wetlands in the last 100 years, conservation groups like The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) in England protect, repair and actually create exciting new wetlands for people and wildlife. The Llanelli Wetland Centre near Swansea, Wales, is one of many wetland centres offering unforgettable opportunities to connect with nature. Boasting 450 acres of wildlife, a visit there features a flock of Caribbean flamingos and a chance to hand feed the rarest goose in the world, the Hawaiian nene. This time of year the first of the new season’s ducklings are hatching, and wild orchids are among the many wildflowers blooming.

All About Bones

By Linda Tancs

Located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and Orlando, Florida, the Museum of Osteology is a unique museum focusing on the form and function of the skeletal system. The exhibits feature hundreds of real animal skeletons (no dinosaurs!) designed to foster an appreciation for the diversity of the animal kingdom existing today. America’s only skeleton museum, it’s family-owned and open year round.

One of the World’s Best Small Gardens

By Linda Tancs

York Gate Garden in Leeds, England, teaches that you can build a stellar garden on a small bit of land. Just one acre in size, it’s divided by yew and beech hedges into a series of small gardens, each with a distinctive theme and style. Abounding with sculpted evergreens, pretty paths and pergolas, the “garden rooms” include a topiary-laden herb garden and an exquisite folly at the Dell, boasting half-hidden pathways and a stream. Given its small size, it should come as no surprise that the locale was once a private family garden. Now it’s enjoyed by visitors from April to September.

Between Two Capes

By Linda Tancs

Extending from Cape Naturaliste in the north to Cape Leeuwin in the south, Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park in Western Australia offers more than 300 limestone caves, significant stands of karri and jarrah forest and impressive views from limestone sea cliffs. The park can be entered at many points along the coast. You can also walk the 86-mile territory (over several days, of course) via the Cape to Cape Walking Track between the park’s namesake lighthouses. Whatever you do, don’t miss Sugarloaf Rock, a popular observation area for seabirds and thought to be the only place in the South West region where the red-tailed tropicbird nests.

Old Wheels in Hershey

By Linda Tancs

There’s more to Hershey, Pennsylvania, than its chocolate-themed park. Indeed, just minutes away is the AACA Museum, an automotive museum dedicated to the preservation and presentation of vintage automobiles and their vast history. A Smithsonian affiliate, the facility showcases vintage vehicle displays and interactive exhibits featuring cars, buses, motorcycles and other vehicles from the 1890s through the 1980s. Permanent exhibits include the Cammack Tucker Gallery (the world’s largest display of Tucker ’48 automobiles and related artifacts), the Route 66 gallery exploring this iconic stretch of roadway and the Museum of Bus Transportation. Special themed exhibits and car shows are plentiful.

America’s National Road

By Linda Tancs

Authorized by Congress in 1806, the National Road was the first highway built entirely with federal funds. It linked the eastern and western states in the first half of the 19th century, running from Cumberland, Maryland, to Vandalia, Illinois. Known in many places as Route 40, its charm lies in the many historic stone bridges along its path and the quaint, untouched towns and villages that called the road “Main Street.” In fact, the road earned the nickname “the Main Street of America.” Of the many inns dotting the route, Mount Washington Tavern (adjoining Fort Necessity Battlefield) in Pennsylvania is an example of a typical stagecoach stop for early travelers on the National Road. Unlike those early settlers, if you drive straight through without stopping, you should be able to complete the route in about 13 hours.

%d bloggers like this: