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Archive for ohio

Air Force History in Ohio

By Linda Tancs

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is a premier location supporting the collection, conservation and presentation of the Air Force’s history, heritage and traditions. The site displays more than 360 aerospace vehicles and missiles, many rare and one-of-a-kind. The galleries chronicle the history of aviation, beginning with the Wright brothers’ legacy and continuing with wartime assets and space launch vehicles. Free guided tours of the museum are offered daily and last approximately one hour and 15 minutes. The facility is located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Celebrating an American Fruit

By Linda Tancs

It may be unfamiliar to many, but the pawpaw is North America’s largest edible native fruit. Its custard-like consistency, often referred to as a cross between a mango and a banana, was favored by George Washington. No doubt he would’ve appreciated a pawpaw festival in his day. One of the largest in our times is the Ohio Pawpaw Festival. Now in its 21st year, the three-day event celebrates our native fruit with events like competitions for the best pawpaw, best pawpaw-related work of art, a cook-off and the pawpaw-eating contest. Taking place at Lake Snowden near Albany, this year’s event is September 13-15.

Making Magic in Ohio

By Linda Tancs

Magi-Fest is one of the largest magic conventions in the United States. Held annually in Columbus, Ohio, the longtime event starts today and runs through Saturday. Performers and lecturers from around the world include Tim Hannig, Juan Tamariz, Adam Rubin and Alfredo Marchese. One of the biggest draws is the dealers room, featuring Magicallusion, H&R Magic Books, Pattrick’s Magical Surfaces and Trick Supply, to name a few.

Legendary Lights in Ohio

By Linda Tancs

What do 4 million Christmas lights look like? Like a blanket of color. Just head on over to historic Clifton Mill in Clifton, Ohio, and see for yourself. One of the largest water-powered grist mills still in existence, the original mill at the site was built in 1802 by Owen Davis, a Revolutionary War soldier and frontiersman miller. During the Christmas season, the mill, along with the gorge, riverbanks, trees and bridge, sparkle and glow, together with a synchronized lights and music show that features the old covered bridge. Go during the week to avoid the weekend crowds.

The House That Rubber Built

By Linda Tancs

Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens is Akron’s first and largest National Historic Landmark. The Ohio property is also the nation’s sixth largest historic home open to the public. Spanning 70 acres, the estate includes five buildings and eight gardens. Named Stan Hywet (Old English for “stone quarry”), the manor house was commissioned by F.A. Seiberling, founder of Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. The colossal house (at 64,500 square feet) is one of the finest examples of Tudor Revival architecture in America. Its furnishings are nearly all original and tell a story of American innovation and enterprise that flourished among the likes of Seiberling and his contemporaries, including the Rockefellers and the Vanderbilts.

An Alaskan Hero

By Linda Tancs

On January 20, 1925, an outbreak of diphtheria in remote Nome, Alaska, made heroes out of a team of sled dogs thanks to their familiarity with the Iditarod Trail, a 674-mile route typically used to carry mail from Anchorage. In just six days a team of huskies led by Balto covered the route to deliver life saving serum to the citizens of Nome. After furious fundraising, Balto and six companions were brought to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1927 and given a hero’s welcome in a triumphant parade through Public Square. The dogs were then taken to the Brookside Zoo (now the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo) to live out their lives in dignity. When Balto died on March 14, 1933, the husky’s body was mounted and is now housed in the permanent collection at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

Black Hand Sandstone and a Hermit

By Linda Tancs

Talk about strange bedfellows.  What does black hand sandstone have to do with a hermit? The answer lies in Hocking Hills State Park in southeastern Ohio. More than 200 million years ago, Ohio’s ancient waters drained away, leaving behind a course sandstone resistant to erosion known as black hand sandstone. The sandstone formed cliffs, gorges and recesses like Ash Cave (Ohio’s largest cave) and Old Man’s Cave. A hermit lived in Old Man’s Cave (hence, the name) in the late 1700s and is buried at the site. Hocking Hills claims not only remarkable geologic sandstone formations and a hermit but also the state’s tallest tree.

Two Thousand Feet of Art

By Linda Tancs

Nestled between the northern banks of the Ohio River and east of the Scioto River is Portsmouth, Ohio.  Given its location at the confluence of these rivers, it’s not surprising that great flooding over nearly a century beginning in the 1800s necessitated the building of a floodwall after the great flood of 1937.  But this isn’t your ordinary run-of-the-mill floodwall.  It’s an outdoor art gallery depicting the last two centuries of the history of Portsmouth and the surrounding area, extending for over 2,000 feet along Front Street in the historic Boneyfiddle District of downtown Portsmouth.  Believed to be the largest known work of art by a single artist, the Portsmouth Murals can be viewed on foot with self-guided audio or from the comfort of your car.

Aligning with the Heavens in Ohio

By Linda Tancs

The largest surviving prehistoric effigy mound is Serpent Mound, located in Peebles, Ohio.  The undulating serpent-shaped earthwork stretches for almost 1350 feet, evoking over the years interpretations related to mysticisms and heavenly alignments.  No wonder, then, that the park grounds are open for extended hours today–the spring equinox–marking Earth’s balance between day and night, a time of many rituals and traditions.  Be prepared for an astronomically good time.

Basket Village USA

By Linda Tancs

Dresden, Ohio is the proud host of the world’s largest basket, a replica of the classic Longaberger basket created by native son Dave Longaberger.  Doyennes of household basket display will love the manufacturing tour.  You’ll find plenty of basket accessories in the village’s quaint shops, along with other fine articles like pottery, glassware, jewelry, clothing, collectibles, artwork, home décor items, and more.

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