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Archive for illinois

Putting Rockford on the Map

By Linda Tancs

Company executive Robert Hall Tinker wanted to build a home that would put Rockford, Illinois, on the map. He succeeded in stunning fashion with a Swiss cottage on the limestone bluff overlooking Kent Creek. Inspired by his tour of Europe in 1862, Tinker Swiss Cottage is surrounded by 27 acres of greenery and is one of only a handful of Swiss-style homes remaining in the United States. A time capsule of the Victorian era, the home and its furnishings now comprise a museum operated by the local park district. Today is one of several Donation Days when entry to the museum is free for Illinois residents. Guided tours are required due to the nature of the artifacts.

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Life in a Glass Box

By Linda Tancs

Located on a 62-acre secured private estate in Plano, Illinois, Farnsworth House is an illustration of life in a glass box. Boasting continuous glass walls, the International Style-house was designed in 1945 by illustrious architect Mies van der Rohe for Dr. Edith Farnsworth. Her country retreat along the Fox River was intended to complement and reflect its natural surroundings. The view is particularly striking in the evening, which is why moonlight tours are back by popular demand. Running at the full moon from May to October, the tours begin at dusk and return after dark. The property is otherwise open from April to November. Buy tickets in advance to guarantee access.

A Grand Mansion in the Illinois Valley

By Linda Tancs

The stately Hegeler Carus Mansion in La Salle, Illinois, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is also a National Historic Landmark. Virtually unaltered since its completion in the late 1800s, the mansion is made of solid brick covered with a type of stucco that has been smoothed and tooled to resemble massive stone blocks. Because zinc (which does not rust) was readily available from the nearby Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, the metal is used throughout the mansion, including on its flat roof, gutters and downspouts. Designed by the architect of Chicago’s famous Water Tower, the residence features a horse shoe staircase and an elegant wrap-around porch that graces three sides of the home, a full story above ground. In addition to being the Hegeler family homestead, the grand estate also became home to Open Court Publishing Company, launched in 1887 by Edward Hegeler to provide a forum for the discussion of philosophy, science and religion and to make philosophical classics widely available by making them affordable.

A Contrast in Illinois

By Linda Tancs

Unlike most of Illinois, the southern tip between the Ohio and Mississippi rivers boasts rolling hills and rugged cliffs teeming with plant and animal life, the likes of which can only mean one thing—you’ve reached a forest. Indeed, this is the site of Shawnee National Forest, the only national forest in the state. Comprising nearly 287,000 acres, one of its best kept secrets is likely High Knob. Just steps away from the parking area, its mountain views rival that of the Smokies. A picnic area provides daytime parking and a trailhead for the five miles of interconnecting trails below the Knob.

The Art of Bean in Chicago

By Linda Tancs

To bean or not to bean—that is the question for visitors to Chicago, Illinois. That is to say, will you visit The Bean? Officially known as Cloud Gate (because 80 percent of its surface reflects the sky), it’s an interactive sculpture (shaped like a bean, of course) gracing the promenade at Millennium Park. Its stainless steel skin captures the environment around it, a mirror to the soul of The Windy City. And a fun house mirror for those gawking at it. The monument is 33 feet high, 42 feet wide and 66 feet long. Its reflection is kept pristine by washing it twice a year with 40 gallons of liquid detergent.

Abe Lincoln Never Slept There

By Linda Tancs

The third oldest continuously occupied governor’s mansion in the nation, the executive mansion in Springfield, Illinois is a gem of Italianate architecture. It’s also rich with native son Abe Lincoln’s artifacts. For starters there’s the “smiling bust” of Lincoln, one he actually posed for. And then there’s the Lincoln table, a priceless work of art created in 1864 from more than 20,000 inlaid wood pieces. From the dizzying elliptical stairway leading upstairs you’ll find the Lincoln bedroom, comprising bedroom furniture given to the Lincolns for their use upon their anticipated return from the White House. Sadly, that was not to be. Although entertained at the mansion, Lincoln actually never slept there. Likewise, he never slept in the Lincoln bedroom at that other executive mansion—the White House.

Leaning Tower of Niles

By Linda Tancs

Wondering what to do on a long layover at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport?  The Leaning Tower of Niles is always an option.  Just 15 minutes away from the airport, Pisa’s half-sized replica was built some 600 years after the original by a local businessman.  Unlike the original, it’s anchored in concrete to hold its characteristic tilt.  After your visit, grab a bite to eat at the world’s first franchised McDonald’s about 10 minutes away.  Who says layovers have to be boring?

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