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Archive for peru

Rainbow Mountain

By Linda Tancs

If Matisse could’ve applied his color palette to an actual mountain, the result would likely resemble Peru’s Vinicunca Mountain. Also known as Rainbow Mountain or the Mountain of Seven Colors, these peaks in the Ausangate Mountain region of the Peruvian Andes offer an impressionistic portrait filled with turquoise, lavender, gold and other colors. You can thank the sediment and atmospheric conditions of the region for the rainbow-like appearance of this growing tourist attraction. A day trip from Cusco, there are plenty of bus tours offering treks, which is best done between March and November.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Cusco’s Sun Temple

By Linda Tancs

Koricancha was the main Inca temple in Cusco (Cuzco), Peru. Its interior was ablaze in gold leaf, befitting its status as the temple of the Sun god. The church and convent of Santo Domingo was built on its Inca foundations by the Spanish in the 1500s. You’ll find the ruins of the ancient temple around the patio of the convent, which also contains a gallery of paintings that includes 17th and 18th century canvases. A guided tour of the site lasts about one hour.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Machu Picchu of the North

By Linda Tancs

Machu Picchu might be Peru’s most-visited site, but there’s an equally dazzling fortress to the north worth a visit. For that head to Chachapoyas, located in the north of Peru along the slopes of the Andes. Already known for its many waterfalls (Gocta being once considered the third highest waterfall in the world), this off-the-beaten-track region of the country boasts a spectacular fortress, Kuélap, outside the city. It’s notable for over 400 circular stone houses inside the complex, occupied by about 3,500 ancient inhabitants. Getting there is the challenging part; air travel is the best route. The nearest airport, Jaén, is a little over three hours away.

A Kiss in Lima

By Linda Tancs

According to an old song, a kiss is just a kiss. Not so in Lima, Peru. The simple act is memorialized in a larger than life way with El Beso (The Kiss), a sculpture produced by native Peruvian Victor Delfin. It overlooks the Pacific Ocean at Parque del Amor (Love Park—what else?) in the touristy Miraflores district of Lima. The statue was unveiled on Valentine’s Day in 1993. Perhaps not surprisingly, the site plays host to an annual kissing contest.

The Candelabra of the Andes

By Linda Tancs

The Paracas Candelabra, also known as the Candelabra of the Andes, is a well-known prehistoric geoglyph nearly 600 feet long on the northern face of the Paracas Peninsula at Pisco Bay in Peru.  That much is certain.  Less certain is what it represents.  Is it a candelabra design, the likes of which would have made Liberace swoon? Or is it a depiction of the trident of Viracocha, the South American god of Incan mythology responsible for creation?  You decide.

The Jungle of the Mirrors

By Linda Tancs

The Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve (2,080,000 hectares), the largest reserve in Peru, is located 183 kilometers from Iquitos and is home to numerous endangered species, like the charapa river turtle, the giant river otter, the black caiman, and the river dolphin.   Sometimes referred to as the jungle of the mirrors, the area is rife with activities for nature lovers, such as birdwatching, canoe rides, piranha fishing, and excursions to a watching tower to observe the birth of the Amazon at the confluence of the Marañón and Ucayali rivers.   Couple that with a stay at the Pacaya Samiria Amazon Lodge at the Marañón River’s bank and you’ve got an idyllic holiday.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Peru

By Linda Tancs

Lake Titicaca, located between Bolivia and Peru, is the highest navigable lake in the world.  Conveniently accessed from Juliaca airport, take the bus or a taxi to Puno, Peru’s capital of folklore.  Your midsummer adventure there should include the cylindrical Sillustani burial towers, one of the world’s most important necropolises just outside Puno.  The cathedral in Puno, built in 1757, is warm and inviting against a frosty midsummer night sky.  After all, the city is located over 3000 meters above sea level.

Some Field Mice Like Heights

By Linda Tancs

Afraid of heights? Then take a lesson from one of the newly discovered inhabitants of the Andes in Peru, a species of field mouse less than four inches in length found dwelling as much as 15,000 feet above sea level in the mountainous forest north of Lima. The insect and seed-eating critter spells good news for the area’s ecosystem.

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Wonders of the World

By Linda Tancs

What a wonder-full world.  After a global vote, the results are in.  The newest 7 wonders of the world are, in no particular order:  The Great Wall of China, Rome’s Colosseum, India’s Taj Mahal, Jordan’s Petra, Peru’s Machu Picchu, Brazil’s Christ the Redeemer, and Mexico’s Chichen Itza.  Will the losing candidates demand a recount?

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