Travelrific® Travel Journal

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Archive for international travel

Leeward in St. Vincent

By Linda Tancs

Picturesque falls, petroglyphs and natural anchorages are some of the features of the leeward side of St. Vincent. And then there are the pirates—the fictional kind, that is. Wallilabou Bay, a port of entry for visiting yachts, is the site where the opening scene of Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl was filmed. Parts of the set remain to the delight of aficionados of the film franchise.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

An Oasis in Paris

By Linda Tancs

Like New York City’s Central Park, Square du Temple in Paris’s Marais district is a lush oasis in the midst of a bustling city. It was designed in the English garden style in the 1800s, a site boasting over 82,000 square feet including an ornamental pool and waterfall, several walking paths, 191 varieties of plants and more than 70 trees. But what you can’t see is perhaps just as interesting as what you can see because the park is located above the remnants of the European stronghold of the Knights Templar. Free and open daily, the nearest Metro station is Temple.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Deserted Village in Yorkshire

By Linda Tancs

Halfway between Scarborough and Clifford Tower lies Wharram Percy, one of the largest and best preserved of Britain’s deserted medieval villages. Its name is derived from the aristocratic Percy family, who lived there between the 12th and 14th centuries. The village was continuously occupied for six centuries before it was abandoned soon after 1500 and today remains the focus of extensive archaeological research. Open during daylight hours, you’ll find the remains of a medieval church as well as grassed-over foundations of two manor houses and about 40 peasant houses and their outbuildings amidst the rugged terrain.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Salt of the Earth in Læsø

By Linda Tancs

Just a 40-minute flight from Copenhagen, the island of Læsø might be best known for its seaweed roofs and white, sandy beaches. But it’s also been a major site of salt production in Denmark since the Middle Ages. The ancient process is known as seething, where groundwater is heated in a large iron pan over a fire in a seething hut until the salt crystallizes. You can listen to a presentation on the process by a salt-seether in a reproduction of a hut from the 12th century.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Captain Cook’s Landing

By Linda Tancs

In 1770, Captain Cook’s first landing in Australia took place near Silver Beach on the Kurnell Peninsula headland. He named the site Stingray Harbour but later changed it to Botany Bay because of the variety of plants found there. An important heritage-listed site, you can discover the area for yourself at the Kurnell area of Kamay Botany Bay National Park. Take the Burrawang walk from the Kurnell Visitor Centre. As you pass over the dune you’ll see views of the bay where Cook’s expedition ship Endeavour was first sighted as well as a plaque marking the location where he landed.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Protected in Sumatra

By Linda Tancs

Located on the tip of the southwest region of Sumatra, Indonesia, Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park is like a fortress for the area’s endangered flora and fauna. For instance, one of the park’s objectives is to protect its lowland rainforests, one of Earth’s most diverse and most threatened. The park is also home to three of the world’s most endangered species: the Sumatran elephant, the Sumatran rhino and the Sumatran tiger. The park’s conservation efforts aim to decrease poaching and deforestation. The main point of entry to the park is from the town of Bandar Lampung.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Maiden’s Tower

By Linda Tancs

Located in Istanbul, Turkey, on an islet at the southern entrance to the Bosphorus, Maiden’s Tower is iconic for its scenic views of the strait and the skyline. It was originally built in 1110 as a defense tower by the Byzantine Emperor Alexius Comnenus although legend has it that an ancient emperor built the tower to hide his beloved daughter whom a fortune teller prophesied would die from a snake bite. Since its inception it has been rebuilt and repurposed many times and now serves as a restaurant. Shuttle boats go there several times a day from both the European and Asian side of Istanbul.

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