Travelrific® Travel Journal

A blog for travel enthusiasts. Listen to our podcasts on the blogroll at Travelrific® Radio. Visit our Wanderful Places® Travel Shop for travel-inspired merchandise!

Archive for germany

The Pied Piper’s Town

By Linda Tancs

Boasting magnificent Renaissance architecture of the Weserberg region, Hameln (Hamelin), Germany, is home to the legendary Pied Piper. As the story goes, in 1284 a man in multicolored (pied) dress promised to lure the rats out of Hameln but instead lured its children away. The folk tale is omnipresent throughout the city, from the open-air play (May through September) retelling the story to the mechanical Pied Piper Theatre in the Hameln Museum and the Pied Piper’s House (Rattenfängerhaus) right in the town center. You can even book the Pied Piper himself at the tourist office for a group welcome greeting or guided city tour.

A Mozart Family Festival

By Linda Tancs

The Bavarian town of Augsburg, Germany, might not immediately come to mind as a town associated with Wolfgang Mozart, who is more famously connected to Salzburg and Vienna. But it is the birthplace of his father Leopold, an influential composer in his own right. Honoring both father and son, the city hosts a Mozart festival every May, performing compositions of both father and son with events for adults as well as children. This year’s festival continues through May 26. Augsburg is easily reachable from Munich by train or car.

Frankfurt’s Secret Sauce

By Linda Tancs

Frankfurt’s secret sauce (as the expression goes) is its green sauce. The German concoction is made of seven different kinds of herbs: borage, chervil, cress, parsley, salad burnet, sorrel and chives. Throw in some sour cream, yogurt, vinegar and oil, and the city’s culinary favorite is born. And, no, it was not invented by the mother of local son Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (although it might have been the renowned writer’s favorite hometown dish). Served cold over hard-boiled eggs and boiled potatoes, it’s the star of its own festival in May. Celebrated from May 11 to May 19 this year, the Green Sauce Festival takes place at Rossmarkt.

The City of Squares

By Linda Tancs

An old pop song exhorted that it’s hip to be square. They’d undoubtedly agree in Mannheim, Germany. Known as the “City of Squares,” Mannheim has exactly 144 of them. Lined up between the palace and the Neckar River, they stretch between the water tower (a beloved landmark) and Kurt Schumacher Bridge. Amidst these squares Mozart gave piano lessons to children, but the squares’ greater renown is perhaps the largest Baroque palace in Europe after Versailles. Designed to highlight the important role of the Palatine Prince Electors in the Holy Roman Empire, its grand interior includes a ceremonial staircase and knights’ hall. Guided tours in English are available by prior arrangement; audio tours are offered in English, French and German. The palace is located on Bismarckstrasse, just ten minutes away from Mannheim’s central station.

A Museum Goes to the Dogs

By Linda Tancs

It’s been an ambassador for Bavaria, a hunter’s indispensable partner and a friend to nobility. We’re talking about the dachshund (“badger dog” in German), a popular dog breed worldwide. And now the first museum devoted to the breed awaits your visit in Passau, Germany. Dackelmuseum sports the 4,500-strong collection of two enthusiasts, showcasing the beloved pet’s role in history and culture. Not surprisingly, dogs are welcome visitors.

Wine and the Rhine

By Linda Tancs

Wine and the Rhine. One might say they go together like peanut butter and jelly. It’s a combination that can’t be beat, which is why the annual Rheingau Wine Festival is one of the highlights in Wiesbaden, Germany, part of the Rheingau wine growing area. Taking place between city hall, market church and parliament from August 10 to August 19, the famous festival features tastings of still and sparkling wines at over 100 stands. The event also includes sumptuous catering and a varied musical program, promising a convivial experience for all.

Munich’s Portal

By Linda Tancs

Among Europe’s biggest city parks, the English Garden in Munich, Germany, rivals New York City’s storied Central Park. An outstanding example of a classical landscape garden, it comprises woodland, meadows and water. Its network of pathways includes bridle paths and over 100 bridges and footbridges. Extending from the Court and Finance Gardens at Odeonsplatz into the open countryside far to the north of the city, this inner-city playground begun in 1789 counts more than 5 million visitors annually. A popular meeting point is the Chinese Tower, where a 7,000-seat beer garden is one of the biggest in Bavaria.

%d bloggers like this: