Travelrific® Travel Journal

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Archive for germany

Mud in Your Eye in Germany

By Linda Tancs

“Here’s mud in your eye” is a toast with a double meaning in Föhr, one of the North Frisian Islands on the German coast of the North Sea. A popular way to get there is by hiking through the tidal mudflats from Emmelsbüll-Horsbüll. After a trek like that you might want a cocktail to ease into some relaxation. The drink you’ll find on virtually any menu is the Manhattan. Conceived, of course, in New York City, its popularity in this second-largest German island of the North Sea cannot be understated. A popular explanation is that German immigrants brought the concoction back to their homeland when fortunes there improved. Whatever the case, you can sleep off your indulgence in one of the island’s unique beach sleeping baskets along its white, sandy beaches.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Rock Solid in Germany

By Linda Tancs

Germany’s Teutoburg Forest is connected to one of the most famous battles in ancient history, that between German tribes (the victors) and three Roman legions in A.D. 9. Nowadays it’s perhaps better known for a rock formation, Externsteine, comprising five enormous sandstone rock pillars near Horn-Bad Meinberg. Entry to the site is free; the closest train station is Paderborn Central Station.

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To limit the spread of COVID-19, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Pure Bliss in the Alps

By Linda Tancs

Some say that Eibsee is the most beautiful lake in Germany. It’s easy to understand why, with its crystal-clear, turquoise waters framed by the Zugspitze, Germany’s highest mountain. Over 3,000 feet above sea level, the lake (named for the yews that used to grow around it) is dotted with islets around its northern side, creating many a photo stop for walkers or hikers. The cool mountain water is great for swimming in summer, too. The A95 motorway from Munich will get you there in about an hour.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Little Girl and Her Geese

By Linda Tancs

Scholarly pursuits may prevail in the university town of Göttingen, Germany, but its most iconic feature is Gänseliesel (Little Goose Girl), a statue erected in 1901 atop a fountain in front of the medieval town hall. The sculpture depicts a young girl and her geese. So beloved is this local landmark that a tradition arose among the newly-minted Ph.D. graduates to plant a kiss on her bronze cheek. In their view, that makes her the most-kissed girl in the world.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Older Than Dinosaurs in Chemnitz

By Linda Tancs

Chemnitz in eastern Germany might be better known as a city formerly named after Karl Marx, whose colossal monument still graces Brückenstrasse. That, you might say, is ancient history, but not nearly as ancient as the petrified tree stumps dating back hundreds of years. They were discovered in the city around the 16th century and can be viewed in the inner courtyard of the DAStietz cultural center.

The Pied Piper’s Town

By Linda Tancs

Boasting magnificent Renaissance architecture of the Weserberg region, Hameln (Hamelin), Germany, is home to the legendary Pied Piper. As the story goes, in 1284 a man in multicolored (pied) dress promised to lure the rats out of Hameln but instead lured its children away. The folk tale is omnipresent throughout the city, from the open-air play (May through September) retelling the story to the mechanical Pied Piper Theatre in the Hameln Museum and the Pied Piper’s House (Rattenfängerhaus) right in the town center. You can even book the Pied Piper himself at the tourist office for a group welcome greeting or guided city tour.

A Mozart Family Festival

By Linda Tancs

The Bavarian town of Augsburg, Germany, might not immediately come to mind as a town associated with Wolfgang Mozart, who is more famously connected to Salzburg and Vienna. But it is the birthplace of his father Leopold, an influential composer in his own right. Honoring both father and son, the city hosts a Mozart festival every May, performing compositions of both father and son with events for adults as well as children. This year’s festival continues through May 26. Augsburg is easily reachable from Munich by train or car.

Frankfurt’s Secret Sauce

By Linda Tancs

Frankfurt’s secret sauce (as the expression goes) is its green sauce. The German concoction is made of seven different kinds of herbs: borage, chervil, cress, parsley, salad burnet, sorrel and chives. Throw in some sour cream, yogurt, vinegar and oil, and the city’s culinary favorite is born. And, no, it was not invented by the mother of local son Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (although it might have been the renowned writer’s favorite hometown dish). Served cold over hard-boiled eggs and boiled potatoes, it’s the star of its own festival in May. Celebrated from May 11 to May 19 this year, the Green Sauce Festival takes place at Rossmarkt.

The City of Squares

By Linda Tancs

An old pop song exhorted that it’s hip to be square. They’d undoubtedly agree in Mannheim, Germany. Known as the “City of Squares,” Mannheim has exactly 144 of them. Lined up between the palace and the Neckar River, they stretch between the water tower (a beloved landmark) and Kurt Schumacher Bridge. Amidst these squares Mozart gave piano lessons to children, but the squares’ greater renown is perhaps the largest Baroque palace in Europe after Versailles. Designed to highlight the important role of the Palatine Prince Electors in the Holy Roman Empire, its grand interior includes a ceremonial staircase and knights’ hall. Guided tours in English are available by prior arrangement; audio tours are offered in English, French and German. The palace is located on Bismarckstrasse, just ten minutes away from Mannheim’s central station.

A Museum Goes to the Dogs

By Linda Tancs

It’s been an ambassador for Bavaria, a hunter’s indispensable partner and a friend to nobility. We’re talking about the dachshund (“badger dog” in German), a popular dog breed worldwide. And now the first museum devoted to the breed awaits your visit in Passau, Germany. Dackelmuseum sports the 4,500-strong collection of two enthusiasts, showcasing the beloved pet’s role in history and culture. Not surprisingly, dogs are welcome visitors.

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