Travelrific® Travel Journal

Picture postcards in prose.™ Check out the blogroll on the front page for official merchandise and other resources!

The History of Florida Citrus

By Linda Tancs

Citrus is an integral part of Florida’s identity, and the industry was especially prominent in the 1800s in Eustis—so much so, in fact, that the town was once known worldwide as the “Orange Capital of the World.” It’s fitting, then, that the town hosts the only independently housed citrus museum in the state. Among its collection, the Citrus Museum features devices used to measure the quality of the fruit, packers’ seals, a device to convert ripe, green-skinned oranges to an orange color and memorabilia like labels and posters.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Little Girl and Her Geese

By Linda Tancs

Scholarly pursuits may prevail in the university town of Göttingen, Germany, but its most iconic feature is Gänseliesel (Little Goose Girl), a statue erected in 1901 atop a fountain in front of the medieval town hall. The sculpture depicts a young girl and her geese. So beloved is this local landmark that a tradition arose among the newly-minted Ph.D. graduates to plant a kiss on her bronze cheek. In their view, that makes her the most-kissed girl in the world.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Trail for the Sweet Tooth

By Linda Tancs

The Nanaimo bar is a popular Canadian dessert, named after its place of origin on Vancouver Island. The tasty, multilayered treat requires no baking and generally comprises a crumb base, custard and ganache. Its variations, though, are so numerous among purveyors that a trail has developed around it. The Nanaimo Bar Trail is a self-guided tour of over 30 scrumptious stops from Lantzville in the north to Cedar in the south and including a stop on Gabriola Island. Pick up your map at the Nanaimo Visitor Centre on Northfield Road.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

The Cosmo Side of Mauritius

By Linda Tancs

Port Louis is the cosmopolitan capital of the island of Mauritius. Founded in 1735 by the French governor and pioneer Bertrand-François Mahé de La Bourdonnais, it offers a plethora of cultural and historical treasures. For one thing, it boasts the oldest racecourse in the Southern Hemisphere, Champ de Mars, where lively horse racing ensues on weekends from March to December. The theater is another pearl, one of the oldest in the region, fashioned after a typical London theater. Did you know that the extinct dodo was endemic to the island? Just as priceless is the Twopenny Blue stamp; an original issue is at the Blue Penny Museum. Originally printed in 1847, the stamps were issued by the then-British colony of Mauritius, the first empire stamps produced outside Britain. The remaining specimens belong to the Crown, some postal museums and some very lucky collectors.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Light North of Shetland

By Linda Tancs

The perils and adventures of lighthouse building no doubt influenced Robert Louis Stevenson, whose father and uncle designed some 30 lighthouses around Scotland’s coasts. One such lighthouse, Muckle Flugga, is the U.K.’s northernmost light, located on a rocky outcrop off the northern tip of Unst in the Shetland Islands. The island’s remote location is cited as inspiration for Robert’s novel, Treasure Island. These days Unst is conveniently linked with the rest of the Shetlands by a bus and ferry system, giving you the chance to experience the island’s treasured grasslands and coastal cliffs for yourself.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Spain’s Land of Spas

By Linda Tancs

Ourense is Spain’s hot spot. Known as the Thermal Capital of Galicia, it’s known for its hot springs. That history is over 2,000 years old, beginning with the Roman baths at As Burgas, where an Interpretation Center explores the development of medicinal baths in this region. The city is a stone’s throw away from Portugal and also accessible via high-speed rail from Madrid.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Gateway to Cheese Country

By Linda Tancs

Wisconsin has a long tradition and history concerning cheese production. Monroe, in particular, is known as the “Gateway to Cheese Country” and the “Cheese Capital of the USA.” So it’s an obvious locale for the National Historic Cheesemaking Center. Tours are led by knowledgeable veteran cheesemakers and docents and include a visit to a restored cheese factory right on the facility’s campus. A special treat awaits visitors this time of year, when on the second Saturday in June a 90-pound wheel of Swiss cheese is made right before your eyes, as it was done over a century ago.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

Fruit of the Vine in Paris

By Linda Tancs

Bordeaux, Bourgogne and Champagne may be France’s better known winemaking regions, but centuries ago Paris was the country’s winemaking hub. It would be easy to forget that bit of history but for the network of newer vineyards in the city paying homage to the ancient ways, the most famous being Le Clos Montmartre. Government-owned and largely tucked away in Parisian parks, the wines produced at these sites are not available commercially. Instead, they’re auctioned off and enjoyed only at select festivals.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

London’s Cheese Bar

By Linda Tancs

Touted as the world’s first cheese conveyor belt restaurant, The Cheese Bar in London offers Pick & Cheese, a bar featuring a conveyor belt with glass-domed plates of cheeses sourced around the U.K. Pick as you please; prices vary according to the color of the plate. Bar seats are available on a walk-in basis for a one-hour period. In the heart of London’s West End, the venue is located just two minutes from Covent Garden Station at Short’s Gardens.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

A Haven for Veggies in Zürich

By Linda Tancs

Swiss cuisine is marked by cheese, mounds of fondue and raclette. Add Geschnetzeltes (small pieces of veal cooked in a creamy mushroom and white wine sauce) to the list in Zürich. You’re not likely to think of tofu, greens and chickpeas—unless, of course, you’re dining at Haus Hiltl, which happens to be the world’s oldest vegetarian restaurant. Founded in 1898 and operated by the fourth generation of the Hiltl family, the eatery is even recognized by Guinness World Records as the world’s oldest, continuously-run vegetarian restaurant. Offering new takes on vegetarian and vegan cuisine, The Hiltl also creates veggie versions of many traditional meat dishes.

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As coronavirus proceeds, it is likely that the vast majority of us will be limited in our travels. But this, too, shall pass. Our love for travel remains, so Travelrific will continue offering travel inspiration in this medium. Please keep those affected by the virus in your thoughts and be sure to follow the safety practices advocated by the Centers for Disease Control. Stay safe, and be well.

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