Travelrific® Travel Journal

Picture postcards in prose.™ Check out the blogroll on the front page for official merchandise and other resources!

Archive for loire valley

Gateway to the Loire

By Linda Tancs

What do Amboise, Azay-le-Rideau, Chenonceau, Chinon, Langeais and Villandry have in common? They’re all just a stone’s throw away from Tours, a gateway city to the Loire Valley in France. Notwithstanding the splendor of these chateaux, the city is full of its own charms, like Place Plumereau. At the heart of the historic center, this small square is studded with eye-catching half-timbered houses. Now through September the place to see and be seen is La Guinguette de Tours sur Loire, a café at the docks offering a mix of dancing, film nights, food and drink and entertainment.

Body and Soul Unite at Castle Chaumont

By Linda Tancs

The international garden festival in France is once again gracing the landscape of Castle Chaumont in the Loire Valley, just 185 km from Paris. This year’s theme, Body and Soul, suggests the restorative properties of gardens and gardening, both spiritually and physically. The jury has selected 20 gardens from over 300 proposals, representing works from Great Britain, Germany, Italy, Japan and the Netherlands. Opening on 29 April, a general entrance ticket covers the festival, castle, stables and the landscaped parkgrounds, all for 15 euros. Take a train to Onzain, and beat a path to the door.

DISCLOSURE OF NO MATERIAL CONNECTION

The author has not received any compensation for writing this content and has no material connection to the brands, topics, products and/or services that are mentioned herein.

Da Vinci Slept Here

By Linda Tancs

Amboise Castle (Château d’Amboise) is a stout fortress in France’s Loire valley.  Its magnificent trappings and gardens no doubt merit a World Heritage designation, but its biggest claim to fame may be for what is–or isn’t–buried in the palace grounds; namely, the remains of Leonardo da Vinci.  The great Renaissance master moved to France in what would be his last years during the reign of King Francis I, accepting a post as “first painter to the king.”  His creative genius is undisputed (a rare occurrence).  What is less certain, however, is his final resting place, reputed to be Saint-Hubert’s chapel on the palace grounds.  According to a story by the Associated Press, his remains were originally buried at the palace church of Saint Florentine but required removal after destruction of the site during the French Revolution.  The identity of the remains removed to Saint-Hubert remains subject to much speculation.  Amboise holds fast to its status as eternal host to one of the world’s finest artists; a simple stone slab on the floor of the church bears his name.  Regardless what you believe, there are plenty of other reasons to visit the palace, like the sweeping views of the town and valley from the castle ramparts.  The intricate Late Gothic carvings on the chapel’s exterior and its interior stained glass windows are worth the visit, too.

Share

DISCLOSURE OF NO MATERIAL CONNECTION

 The author has not received any compensation for writing this content and has no material connection to the brands, topics, products and/or services that are mentioned herein.

%d bloggers like this: